Avast in advanced talks to sell itself to NortonLifeLock

Avast in advanced talks to sell itself to NortonLifeLock

One of the largest cybersecurity companies in the world is in discussions regarding a merger

The London-listed Avast is in advanced talks with US rival NortonLifeLock Inc about a deal that would create a leader in consumer security software. The Wall Street Journal first reported the deal, which could value Avast at more than $8 billion. According to analysts, "nothing short of a $10 billion valuation is fair to Avast's shareholders".

Avast and NortonLifeLock confirmed the talks on Wednesday, with the first revealing that an offer would be both in cash and shares. However, it mentioned there was no certainty a deal would take place. Under the UK laws, the US company has until August 11 to announce its intentions to make an offer.

Following the news, Avast shares surged the most in over a year, closing the London session 14% up at 575.20 pence. Since the beginning of the year, Avast gained approx. 7.1% reaching a market value of about $8.2 billion.

Sources: Bloomberg.com, reuters.com

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