Veolia and Suez reached an in-principle deal

Veolia and Suez reached an in-principle deal

After battling in court over terms, Suez and Veolia reached an agreement

Last year, two of the most important European domestic utility providers, Veolia and Engie, were in talks to close a deal. At that time, Veolia was looking to purchase 29.9% of Suez at €15.50 per share, a price that valued the deal at around €2.9 billion.

Since February 2021, when the Paris-based Suez turned down an €11.3 billion takeover, the two companies have battled in court over the deals' terms. At that time, Suez considered Veolia's interest a takeover which "has not been solicited and has not been discussed at all with Suez."

Finally, it seems that the two companies have reached an in-principal agreement. The deal values Suez at €20.50 per share. Moreover, Suez won't dispose of its Australian assets, and it will deactivate its Dutch foundation.

Veolia and Suez have agreed to enter a definite merger by May 14.

Following the news, Veolia stock price went up 4%, while Suez gained 7%.

Sources: marketwatch.com, cnbc.com

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